Chard –

Scientific and Common Namesorganic CSA farm swiss chard
Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla

Perpetual Spinach
Chard
Silverbeet
Swiss Chard

About

Chard (Beta vulgaris var. cicla), also known by the common names Swiss Chard, Silverbeet, Perpetual Spinach, Spinach Beet, Crab Beet, Seakale Beet and Mangold, is a leafy vegetable, and is one of the cultivated descendants of the sea beet, Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima. Chard is a leafy green vegetables often used in Mediterranean cooking. The leaves can be green or reddish in color, chard stalks also vary in color. Chard has been bred to have highly nutritious leaves at the expense of the root (which is not as nutritious as the leaves). Chard is considered to be one of the healthiest vegetables available and a valuable addition to a healthy diet (like other green leafy vegetables). Chard has been around for centuries, but because of its similarity to beets it is difficult to determine the exact evolution of the different varieties of chard. Although the leaves are eaten, it is in the same species as beetroot (garden beet) which is usually grown primarily for its edible roots. Chard and the other beets are chenopods, a group which is either its own family Chenopodiaceae or a subfamily within the Amaranthaceae.
The word Swiss was used to distinguish chard from French spinach varieties by 19th century seed catalog publishers. The chard is very popular among Mediterranean cooks. The first varieties have been traced back to Sicily.

Growing

Chard can be harvested while the leaves are young and tender or after maturity when they are larger and have slightly tougher stems. Chard is extremely perishable. Chard has shiny green ribbed leaves, with stems that range from white to yellow and red depending on the cultivar. It has a slightly bitter, but sweet taste.

Nutritional Content

Swiss chard is high in vitamins AK and C, with a 175 g serving containing 214%, 716%, and 53%, respectively, of therecommended daily value.[11] It is also rich in minerals, dietary fiber and protein.[12]
SwissChard

Uses

Fresh young chard can be used raw in salads. Mature chard leaves and stalks are typically cooked (like in pizzoccheri) or sauteed; their bitterness fades with cooking, leaving a refined flavor which is more delicate than that of cooked spinach. All parts of the chard plant contain oxalic acid.

Recipes

Sautéed Swiss Chard with Parmesan Cheese
Recipe provided by www.Allrecipes.com; Recipe submitted by: DannyBoy.
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1/2 small red onion, diced
  • 1 bunch Swiss chard, stems and center ribs cut out and chopped together, leaves coarsely chopped separately
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice, or to taste
  • 2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • salt to taste (optional)
  1. Melt butter and olive oil together in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in the garlic and onion, and cook for 30 seconds until fragrant. Add the chard stems and the white wine.
  2. Simmer until the stems begin to soften, about 5 minutes. Stir in the chard leaves, and cook until wilted.
  3. Finally, stir in lemon juice and Parmesan cheese; season to taste with salt if needed.