Rutabaga
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Scientific Classification

Kingdom:
Plantae
(unranked):
Angiosperms
(unranked):
Eudicots
(unranked):
Rosids
Order:
Brassicales
Family:
Brassicaceae
Genus:
Brassica
Species:
B. napobrassica
Binomial name
Brassica napobrassica
(L.) Mill.

About
The rutabaga, swede (from Swedish turnip), or yellow turnip (Brassica napobrassica, or Brassica napus var. napobrassica, or Brassica napus subsp. rapifera) is a root vegetable that originated as a cross between the cabbage and the turnip. The roots are prepared for food in a variety of ways, and its leaves can also be eaten as a leaf vegetable.
The first known printed reference to the rutabaga comes from the Swiss botanist Gaspard Bauhin in 1620, where he notes that it was growing wild in Sweden. It is often considered to have originated from Scandinavia or Russia.[3] It is said to have been widely introduced to England around the end of the 18th century, but it was recorded as being present in the royal gardens in England as early as 1669 and was described in France in 1700. It was asserted by Sir John Sinclair in his Husbandry of Scotland to have been introduced to Scotland around 1781-1782. An article on the topic in The Gardeners’ Chronicle suggests that the rutabaga was then introduced more widely to England in 1790. Introduction to North America came in the early 19th century with reports of planted rutabaga crops in Illinois as early as 1817.[4]
Uses
Finns cook rutabagas in a variety of ways; roasted to be served with meat dishes, as the major ingredient in the ever popular Christmas dish Swede casserole (“lanttulaatikko”), as a major flavor enhancer in soups, uncooked and thinly julienned as a side dish or in a salad, baked, or boiled. Finns use rutabagas in most dishes that call for any root vegetable.
Swedes and Norwegians cook rutabagas with potatoes, sometimes with the addition of carrots for color, and mash them with butter and cream or milk to create a puree called “rotmos” (Swedish, literally: root mash) and “kålrabistappe” (Norwegian). Onion is occasionally added. In Norway, kålrabistappe is an obligatory accompaniment to many festive dishes, including smalahove, pinnekjøtt, raspeball and salted herring. In Wales, a similar dish produced using just potatoes and rutabagas is known as “potch.”
In Scotland, rutabagas and potatoes are boiled and mashed separately to produce “tatties and neeps” (“tatties” being the Scots word for potatoes), traditionally served with the Scottish national dish of haggis as the main course of a Burns supper. Rutabagas have also been used in Scotland and more widely in the UK as a carved out lantern during Halloween.[7] Neeps may also be mashed with potatoes to make clapshot. Regional variations include the addition of onions to clapshot in Orkney. Neeps are also extensively used in soups and stews. In the English counties of Yorkshire and Lincolnshire, swedes are often mashed together with carrots as part of the traditional Sunday roast.
In Canada rutabagas are used as filler in foods such as mincemeat and Christmas cake, or as a side dish with Sunday dinner in Atlantic Canada. In the US rutabagas are mostly eaten as part of stews or casseroles, served mashed with carrots, or baked in a pasty.
Recipes

Whitechapel Shepherd’s Pie
Recipe provided by www.Allrecipes.com; Recipe submitted by: Gigi.
1 stalk celery, chopped
3 carrots, peeled and chopped
1 parsnip, peeled and diced
1 small rutabaga, chopped
1/4 cup frozen green peas
1 pound ground lamb
1 onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 (8 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon dried sage
1/2 cup milk, or as needed
3 cups prepared mashed potatoes
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
1.Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
2.Place the celery, carrots, parsnip, rutabaga, and peas into a large saucepan and fill with 1 inch of water. Bring to a boil, cover, and steam for 15 minutes, or until vegetables are tender.
3.Meanwhile, crumble the ground lamb into a large skillet set over medium heat. Add onion and garlic; cook and stir until lamb is no longer pink. Drain off any grease. Stir in the steamed vegetables and tomato sauce. Season with salt, pepper, thyme and sage. Transfer everything to a greased 7×11 inch baking dish.
4.Mix enough milk into the mashed potatoes to make them spreadable. Spread them over the top of the casserole and garnish with a sprinkling of Parmesan cheese.
5.Bake for 25 minutes in the preheated oven, until the top is browned and the casserole is heated through.